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Pottery at the Crossroads: Ceramic Trends in Southeast Arcadia

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dc.contributor.author Voyatzis, Mary E.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-10-19T15:10:16Z
dc.date.available 2011-10-19T15:10:16Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation In: Østby, Erik (ed.), Ancient Arcadia 2005: 467-482 en_US
dc.identifier.isbn 82-91626-25-1
dc.identifier.issn 1105-4204
dc.identifier.uri http://digital-ub.uib.no/1956.2/3047
dc.description Papers from the third international seminar on Ancient Arcadia, held at the Norwegian Institute at Athens, 7-10 May 2002 en_US
dc.description.abstract Ceramics found at Arcadian sites play a potentially important role in helping us to understand the extent of cultural uniformity in the region. This paper examines the nature of the pottery from various sites in Arcadia between the 10th and 7th centuries s.c. From the 10th to the early 8th centuries, we have limited ceramic representation in the region, with a large assemblage of ceramics known only from the southeastern part of the region, from the sanctuary of Athena Alea at Tegea. It is not until the late 8th and early 7th centuries that we start to have significant ceramic remains from northern, southwestern, and eastern Arcadia. Interestingly there is very little uniformity between contemporary types of pottery from the different parts of the region. There is no 'Arcadian' style as such. Instead, what we see are cultural pockets of influence. In southeastern Arcadia in the Early Iron Age, for instance, we have ceramics that reflect an affinity with Argive Protogeometric and Geometric, as well as large amounts of a style known as Laconian Protogeometric. This mixture suggests influences coming to Tegea from both neighboring regions, i.e., from the Argolid and from Laconia. By the late 8th - early 7th centuries, we see Corinthian intluence in the ceramics from sites throughout Arcadia. In sum, the ceramic remains from Arcadia reveal little evidence for uniformity of style or for innovative local schools, between the 10th and 7th centuries. On the other hand, we see considerable diversity in the local adaptations of the regional pottery styles of the Peloponnese. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher The Norwegian Institute at Athens en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Papers of the Norwegian Institute at Athens en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries 8 en_US
dc.subject.other Pottery, Greek en_US
dc.title Pottery at the Crossroads: Ceramic Trends in Southeast Arcadia en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US
dc.subject.nsi VDP::Humaniora: 000::Arkeologi: 090::Klassisk arkeologi: 092 en_US


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